Posts tagged revolution

More than 160 academics have written to the Guardian to protest at being used as an extension of the UK border police, after universities have come under more pressure to check the immigration details of students.

Yep; in 2013, supervisors of ‘overseas’ PhD were required, for the first time, to administer monthly checks to be reported to the Home Office, alongside our quarterly ‘census’ checkpoints where we have to report to our administrative office or risk being kicked out of our programme for failing to report, even if you’re on fieldwork. More here.

H/T: C Mills.

3 notes 

In other words, a real leader is somebody who can help us overcome the limitations of our own individual laziness and selfishness and weakness and fear and get us to do better things than we can get ourselves to do on our own.

I am, colloquially and perhaps pseduo-professionally, an ‘expert’ on leadership, particularly political leadership, but nonetheless… I subscribed to Brain Pickings weekly newsletter, which I really, really, really encourage anyone concerned with workings of the mind to do; this week there was a section on David Foster Wallace, who committed suicide last week, leadership, and his book Consider the Lobster - all really worth your while.

And we get to this quote from Wallace (above).

Just a completely textured, gorgeous definition of leadership that really makes us reflect on how we’ve ‘dumbed down’/’traded up’ the words ‘leader’ and ‘leadership’; being someone who is finishing a doctoral thesis on executive leadership, I’m definitely guilty.

But the quote makes me not so much reflect on my research - cause that shit is golden (ponyboy) - but rather reflect on myself as a leader - maybe not now, maybe the leader I someday hope to have the chance to be - and part of the reason I started this (non)blog: lead ‘the revolution’ better by learning more about ‘the revolution’, hence revolutiontrainee (and almost all my posts, except the ones about cats and fashion… probably).

My conundrum with this brilliant definition of leadership is that I see myself in these relationships, where I guide my interactions based on these principles, and I want to think I have helped someone, anyone, everyone overcome what wasn’t possible without my leadership friendship. But just as my PhD supervisors are constantly on me about nailing down what ‘matters’ means when I talk about leadership that ‘matters’ - particularly in my methodology chapter, amiright?! - do leaders ever really KNOW that their presence has helped someone, anyone, everyone overcome what wasn’t possible without their leadership? Because doesn’t acknowledging the idea negate the position as a leader?

And it makes me reflect further on one characteristic of leaders that surely makes it impossible to ever see one’s leadership in a way that ‘mattered’ - vision. Vision has no temporarility; vision has no end goal, because vision is transformative: ‘the revolution’. The revolution doesn’t happen (and won’t happen) until everyone is on board, and surely at the point where everyone has bypassed laziness, selfishness, weakness, and fear in favour of the good, it’s no longer the leader who has led; it’s everyone - for the people, by the people. And here, I found, it’s best to leave it with Zadie Smith, for this is the only solace in my conundrum:

Resign yourself to the lifelong sadness that comes from never being satisfied.

Amiright?

1 note 

eastafriqueen:

Protests by Eritrean and Sudanese refugees at the Holot Prison:

Eritrean and Sudanese Refugees held a 2 day Protest on from 2/17-2/18 at the Holot “Open” Prison in Southern Israel.

The Holot Detention Center is one of several detention centers Israel has opened specifically to imprison Asylum Seekers referred to as “Infiltrators” by The State of Israel. Most if not all of those imprisoned are Eritrean or Sudanese.

The 4th photo in this photoset shows some of those who are currently being held in Holot joining in the protests from behind the prison gates. Protestors spent the night on the grounds outside the prison to be ready for day 2 of the protests. 

The protestors are demanding that Holot and other prisons like it be shut down, those being held and all Asylum Seekers have their applications processed and that their human rights be observed and respected.

Photos from: activestills.org and 972mag.com.

1,002 notes 

vicemag:

vicenews:

Pussy Riot Getting Whipped in Sochi

VICE News was with Pussy Riot in Sochi when group of uniformed Cossacks attacked members of the protest group with pepper spray and horse whips. Just moments earlier, Nadya Tolokonnikova, Masha Alyokhina, and a handful of other members headed out of a cafe toward the Sochi seaport, where they prepared to perform. As they were putting on their neon ski masks, about a dozen Cossacks descended on the group, thrashing them with whips, throwing them to the ground and kicking them as police officers stood by. The police allowed the mini-pogrom to continue for about ten minutes.

Read more about Pussy Riot and the events surrounding the attack

Everything about this video is upsetting and insane, but the moment when a mascot in a giant dog costume accosts and then shames Pussy Riot is especially surreal.

Anyone can be Pussy Riot.

1,265 notes 

descentintotyranny:

Caracas Chronicles — The Game Changed in Venezuela Last Night – and the International Media Is Asleep At the Switch
Feb. 20 2014
Dear International Editor:
Listen and understand. The game changed in Venezuela last night. What had been a slow-motion unravelling that had stretched out over many years went kinetic all of a sudden.
What we have this morning is no longer the Venezuela story you thought you understood.
Throughout last night, panicked people told their stories of state-sponsored paramilitaries on motorcycles roaming middle class neighborhoods, shooting at people and  storming into apartment buildings, shooting at anyone who seemed like he might be protesting. People continue to be arrested merely for protesting, and a long established local Human Rights NGO makes an urgent plea for an investigation into widespread reports of torture of detainees. There are now dozens of serious human right abuses: National Guardsmen shooting tear gas canisters directly into residential buildings. We have videos of soldiers shooting civilians on the street. And that’s just what came out in real time, over Twitter and YouTube, before any real investigation is carried out. Online media is next, a city of 645,000 inhabitants has been taken off the internet amid mounting repression, and this blog itself has been the object of a Facebook “block” campaign.
What we saw were not “street clashes”, what we saw is a state-hatched offensive to suppress and terrorize its opponents.
After the major crackdown on the streets of major (and minor) Venezuelan cities last night, I expected some kind of response in the major international news outlets this morning. I understand that with an even bigger and more photogenic freakout ongoing in an even more strategically important country, we weren’t going to be front-page-above-the-fold, but I’m staggered this morning to wake up, scan the press and find…
Nothing.
Read More

descentintotyranny:

Caracas Chronicles — The Game Changed in Venezuela Last Night – and the International Media Is Asleep At the Switch

Feb. 20 2014

Dear International Editor:

Listen and understand. The game changed in Venezuela last night. What had been a slow-motion unravelling that had stretched out over many years went kinetic all of a sudden.

What we have this morning is no longer the Venezuela story you thought you understood.

Throughout last night, panicked people told their stories of state-sponsored paramilitaries on motorcycles roaming middle class neighborhoods, shooting at people and  storming into apartment buildings, shooting at anyone who seemed like he might be protesting. People continue to be arrested merely for protesting, and a long established local Human Rights NGO makes an urgent plea for an investigation into widespread reports of torture of detainees. There are now dozens of serious human right abuses: National Guardsmen shooting tear gas canisters directly into residential buildings. We have videos of soldiers shooting civilians on the street. And that’s just what came out in real time, over Twitter and YouTube, before any real investigation is carried out. Online media is next, a city of 645,000 inhabitants has been taken off the internet amid mounting repression, and this blog itself has been the object of a Facebook “block” campaign.

What we saw were not “street clashes”, what we saw is a state-hatched offensive to suppress and terrorize its opponents.

After the major crackdown on the streets of major (and minor) Venezuelan cities last night, I expected some kind of response in the major international news outlets this morning. I understand that with an even bigger and more photogenic freakout ongoing in an even more strategically important country, we weren’t going to be front-page-above-the-fold, but I’m staggered this morning to wake up, scan the press and find…

Nothing.

Read More

34 notes 

diegueno:

This week, Tunisia passed a truly historic constitution widely heralded as a progressive and monumental document. Here’s just some of what these brave elected representatives agreed upon in the face of strong pressure from the more extreme factions of their parties:
Guaranteed equality between men and women
A constitutional mandate for environmental protection, only the third country in the world to do so
A declaration that health care is a human right, with preventative care and treatment for every citizen
A democracy with civil laws that respects freedom of religion
An established right to due process and protection from torture
In one stroke,
Tunisia’s become more democratic than many Western countries have been for years.This is a revolution of democracy and a great victory for human rights — and the more we recognize that, the more Tunisia can shine as an example for the Western and the Arab world!Congratulate the Legislators!MESSAGE FOR TUNISIAN LEGISLATORS: We , the citizens of the world, applaud your bravery in making a strong commitment to universal human values in your constitution. People deprived of democracy around the world look to you to set the example of human rights and democratic principle — hold true to the promises made in this revolutionary document! (via Three Cheers for Tunisia’s Revolutionary Constitution!)

diegueno:

This week, Tunisia passed a truly historic constitution widely heralded as a progressive and monumental document. 

Here’s just some of what these brave elected representatives agreed upon in the face of strong pressure from the more extreme factions of their parties:

  • Guaranteed equality between men and women
  • A constitutional mandate for environmental protection, only the third country in the world to do so
  • A declaration that health care is a human right, with preventative care and treatment for every citizen
  • A democracy with civil laws that respects freedom of religion
  • An established right to due process and protection from torture
In one stroke,
Tunisia’s become more democratic than many Western countries have been for years.

This is a revolution of democracy and a great victory for human rights — and the more we recognize that, the more Tunisia can shine as an example for the Western and the Arab world!

Congratulate the Legislators!

MESSAGE FOR TUNISIAN LEGISLATORS: We , the citizens of the world, applaud your bravery in making a strong commitment to universal human values in your constitution. People deprived of democracy around the world look to you to set the example of human rights and democratic principle — hold true to the promises made in this revolutionary document!

65,114 notes 

#I’m not welcome

My colleagues have started a social action group in response to the discriminatory treatment we receive as overseas students in the UK and the rift this treatment creates between ‘home’ and overseas students.Here’s a snippet from our ‘message’:

The campaign stems from the feelings and perceptions that we are not ‘welcome’ anymore because of immigration policies set out by the current administration.  We know that universities are being caught up in a ‘regulatory conundrum’ by the UKBA and being asked to act as ‘information and surveillance centres’.  The situation is very complex but what we are aiming for is not to allow the UKBA policies ruin the social relations between overseas students and the university by building a more personal dialogue rather than being sent threatening emails such as ‘If we do not hear from you within 5 days of receiving this email we will have no alternative but to request that your absence be reported to the UK Border Agency (UKBA). This will mean that your permission to remain in the UK will be curtailed and you will have to return home as soon as possible (but definitely within 60 days). If registered, you will be withdrawn from your course at the University.’ 

For many overseas students coming to study here represents a big effort in all terms (emotionally, financially and logistically) but many of us feel it is still worth it and there are many positive elements of the experience, therefore, we don’t want the current government’s view on immigration ruin the legacy and relevance of building more inclusive and respectful intellectual environments.

We also have ‘census checkpoints’ four times a year - which up until this year were announced with only days notice and lasted only 1 or 2 days - even in the summer when many PhDs undertake fieldwork, and if we don’t attend these checkpoints we are reported to UKBA as ‘missing’.

Academia needs overseas researchers to foster the ‘rich culture’ British universities claim to promote. However, overseas students find the Home Office’s bottom line is more important than this supposed ‘richness’ we bring. Check out our petition, the Facebook group, and the new Twitter page

Are any of my tumblr colleagues able to help us spread our message to other universities?

For many of you 1914 probably seems like a long time ago but I’ll be 91 next year, so it feels recent. Today, we have allowed monolithic corporate institutions to set our national agenda. We have allowed vitriol to replace earnest debate and we have somehow deluded ourselves into thinking that wealth is wisdom. But by far the worst error we have made as a people is to think ourselves as taxpayers first and citizens second.

Next year, I won’t wear the poppy but I will until my last breath remember the past and the struggles my generation made to build this country into a civilised state for the working and middle classes. If we are to survive as a progressive nation we have to start tending to our living because the wounded: our poor, our underemployed youth, our hard-pressed middle class and our struggling seniors shouldn’t be left to die on the battleground of modern life.

Excellent, excellent read from the 91-year-old Harry Leslie Smith.

2 notes 

On revolution and Russell Brand…
I write a (non)blog called Revolution Trainee, and some people who know me personally say it should be titled something more indicative of my own role as a revolutionary. I maintain that we all, if we are decent revolutionaries, constantly learn, re-learn, pick and choice our revolution - hence the title Revolution Trainee. As such, I feel compelled to respond to the recent revival of the word revolution in the mass media and all that incorporates Russell Brand’s role in said revolution. And I’ll be candid up front, there are a few people in particular I’m responding to here, so forgive me if this isn’t the end-all be-all post on revolution. …everyone is a critic, and this IS tumblr.
First, on the word revolution, my use of it, and the mass media’s usage: Brand’s response to Robert Webb today in/on the Guardian lends to the idea that revolution = violence (re: death camps). Perhaps we need to bring Michel Foucault back from the dead (no, no, rest in peace, Foucault; you’ve done enough for us), but we need to remember how language is connected to power. Using revolution as word that is reminiscent of violence only further connects revolutionaries to the neoliberal, military-industrial society - the exact something ‘we’, as revolutionaries, are trying to escape. Being a revolutionary has NOTHING to do with violence, unless you are truly shit at being a revolutionary. Part of a group of young poli sci graduate students in Denver years ago, there was a discussion as to whether revolution could be peaceful. Composed of (self-described) Marxist, anarchists, socialist, etc, the resounding response was a ‘successful’ revolution would inherently be violent. LISTEN CAREFULLY YOUNG REVOLUTIONARIES: this is the folly of youth; the folly of WANTING to see the streets full of chaos, but live through a riot and ferment on it. With age and sage comes the wisdom that revolutions do not need to be violent to be successful. What a revolution needs to be to be, indeed a revolution and successful, is a mass change in thinking. That is what a revolution is, and so long as we keep attaching violence as a necessary condition for revolution, we will keep working further and further AWAY from an actual revolution. Again, evoking Foucault, by attaching the language of violence to the language of revolution, we only give states like the USA, Bahrain, and Brazil further reason to re-up on their supply of ‘crowd-control’, ‘non-lethal’ military supply - DO YOU SEE HOW THIS IS ANTITHETICAL TO AN ACTUAL REVOLUTION?!
Second - and I cannot emphasise this point enough, particularly to tumblrs who advocate social justice and equality - anyone can be a revolutionary, even Russell Brand. There are two points to be made here: the first is that a revolution is neigh a revolution unless it is INCLUSIVE of the masses, regardless of sex, race, sexual preference, religion, or ‘creed’. The second is that just because someone speaks of revolution, particularly in a way like Brand who advocates not voting, does not mean you have to follow them. Indeed that would be the opposite of being a revolutionary; I’m looking at you ‘hipster conformists’ (South Park).
To the first point, I see a great many people who have the potential to be great leaders - and leadership being the central focus of my doctoral research, is something I know a great deal about, and not just from reading (everyone’s a critic) - but so many people with such potential have the tendency to be so divisive. Yes, Brand is a rich, white celebrity; he acknowledges this, and according to the laws of tumblr, one can ‘escape’ privilege as best as they can by acknowledging it affects their perspective, which Brand has done, albeit with the caveat that life has not been easy for a non-traditionally educated, lower class, London drug addict. He embraces his past and his privilege and speaks how they influence his (revolutionary) politics. So to all those individuals who say something to the degree of: ‘A white man will never be my leader’, you’re part of the problem. Before you start in, yes, I understand your argument (its YOUR revolution) - just like I understand Laurie Penny’s argument about Brand’s ‘brocialism’ -  but you do understand how being exclusive and reductionistic makes you the opposite of a revolutionary? I suggest you watch a quick clip from the President of the World. There will be no 21st century revolution without inclusivity, and there is/should be a place for every individual in the revolution. There is no revolution without the Kogi, the Muslims in the Rohingya state, or a focus on development, income equality, and justice for all. So long as you discriminate against people like Brand based on their gender, economic status, or race, you are part of the problem, and you have no place in the 21st century revolution.
To the second point, Laurie Penny points out the irony of Brand’s ‘revolutionary’ status whilst on a tour called the Messiah Complex; it’s not lost on Brand either. Che did not ask the ‘revolutionaries’ of Cuba or Bolivia to follow him; it was never about him, just like it was never about MLK, Gandhi, or Malcom X. ‘It’ (the revolution) is about us, as a global community of people who see injustice, unsustainable systems, and inequality, and our ability to take that message, as truthfully, as open-mindedly as possible to our peers - and by peers I mean human beings. If you think anyone is ‘excluded’ or ‘below’ your revolutionary message, again, you are not a revolutionary. If Brand’s revolution is not your revolution, no one forces you to follow. Robert Webb, if you want to continue to vote, then do so. But if you don’t vote because you see that you are supporting a system that you are so fundamentally opposed to, that’s your right in a participatory democracy (if you happen to live in one, which most of us do). Some of us see that Russia isn’t the only illiberal democracy in the world, and instead of voting we create our own revolution. That’s our choice, just as it’s yours.
Create your own revolution, no matter how big or small. But know: if it is violent, it is not a revolution; if it is not inclusive of the global community, it is not a revolution … at least not in this century.
The irony of today being Guy Fawkes Day is not lost on me.
As always, VIVA REVOLUTION! RISE UP! RISE AGAINST!

On revolution and Russell Brand…

I write a (non)blog called Revolution Trainee, and some people who know me personally say it should be titled something more indicative of my own role as a revolutionary. I maintain that we all, if we are decent revolutionaries, constantly learn, re-learn, pick and choice our revolution - hence the title Revolution Trainee. As such, I feel compelled to respond to the recent revival of the word revolution in the mass media and all that incorporates Russell Brand’s role in said revolution. And I’ll be candid up front, there are a few people in particular I’m responding to here, so forgive me if this isn’t the end-all be-all post on revolution. …everyone is a critic, and this IS tumblr.

First, on the word revolution, my use of it, and the mass media’s usage: Brand’s response to Robert Webb today in/on the Guardian lends to the idea that revolution = violence (re: death camps). Perhaps we need to bring Michel Foucault back from the dead (no, no, rest in peace, Foucault; you’ve done enough for us), but we need to remember how language is connected to power. Using revolution as word that is reminiscent of violence only further connects revolutionaries to the neoliberal, military-industrial society - the exact something ‘we’, as revolutionaries, are trying to escape. Being a revolutionary has NOTHING to do with violence, unless you are truly shit at being a revolutionary. Part of a group of young poli sci graduate students in Denver years ago, there was a discussion as to whether revolution could be peaceful. Composed of (self-described) Marxist, anarchists, socialist, etc, the resounding response was a ‘successful’ revolution would inherently be violent. LISTEN CAREFULLY YOUNG REVOLUTIONARIES: this is the folly of youth; the folly of WANTING to see the streets full of chaos, but live through a riot and ferment on it. With age and sage comes the wisdom that revolutions do not need to be violent to be successful. What a revolution needs to be to be, indeed a revolution and successful, is a mass change in thinking. That is what a revolution is, and so long as we keep attaching violence as a necessary condition for revolution, we will keep working further and further AWAY from an actual revolution. Again, evoking Foucault, by attaching the language of violence to the language of revolution, we only give states like the USA, Bahrain, and Brazil further reason to re-up on their supply of ‘crowd-control’, ‘non-lethal’ military supply - DO YOU SEE HOW THIS IS ANTITHETICAL TO AN ACTUAL REVOLUTION?!

Second - and I cannot emphasise this point enough, particularly to tumblrs who advocate social justice and equality - anyone can be a revolutionary, even Russell Brand. There are two points to be made here: the first is that a revolution is neigh a revolution unless it is INCLUSIVE of the masses, regardless of sex, race, sexual preference, religion, or ‘creed’. The second is that just because someone speaks of revolution, particularly in a way like Brand who advocates not voting, does not mean you have to follow them. Indeed that would be the opposite of being a revolutionary; I’m looking at you ‘hipster conformists’ (South Park).

To the first point, I see a great many people who have the potential to be great leaders - and leadership being the central focus of my doctoral research, is something I know a great deal about, and not just from reading (everyone’s a critic) - but so many people with such potential have the tendency to be so divisive. Yes, Brand is a rich, white celebrity; he acknowledges this, and according to the laws of tumblr, one can ‘escape’ privilege as best as they can by acknowledging it affects their perspective, which Brand has done, albeit with the caveat that life has not been easy for a non-traditionally educated, lower class, London drug addict. He embraces his past and his privilege and speaks how they influence his (revolutionary) politics. So to all those individuals who say something to the degree of: ‘A white man will never be my leader’, you’re part of the problem. Before you start in, yes, I understand your argument (its YOUR revolution) - just like I understand Laurie Penny’s argument about Brand’s ‘brocialism’ -  but you do understand how being exclusive and reductionistic makes you the opposite of a revolutionary? I suggest you watch a quick clip from the President of the World. There will be no 21st century revolution without inclusivity, and there is/should be a place for every individual in the revolution. There is no revolution without the Kogi, the Muslims in the Rohingya state, or a focus on development, income equality, and justice for all. So long as you discriminate against people like Brand based on their gender, economic status, or race, you are part of the problem, and you have no place in the 21st century revolution.

To the second point, Laurie Penny points out the irony of Brand’s ‘revolutionary’ status whilst on a tour called the Messiah Complex; it’s not lost on Brand either. Che did not ask the ‘revolutionaries’ of Cuba or Bolivia to follow him; it was never about him, just like it was never about MLK, Gandhi, or Malcom X. ‘It’ (the revolution) is about us, as a global community of people who see injustice, unsustainable systems, and inequality, and our ability to take that message, as truthfully, as open-mindedly as possible to our peers - and by peers I mean human beings. If you think anyone is ‘excluded’ or ‘below’ your revolutionary message, again, you are not a revolutionary. If Brand’s revolution is not your revolution, no one forces you to follow. Robert Webb, if you want to continue to vote, then do so. But if you don’t vote because you see that you are supporting a system that you are so fundamentally opposed to, that’s your right in a participatory democracy (if you happen to live in one, which most of us do). Some of us see that Russia isn’t the only illiberal democracy in the world, and instead of voting we create our own revolution. That’s our choice, just as it’s yours.

Create your own revolution, no matter how big or small. But know: if it is violent, it is not a revolution; if it is not inclusive of the global community, it is not a revolution … at least not in this century.

The irony of today being Guy Fawkes Day is not lost on me.

As always, VIVA REVOLUTION! RISE UP! RISE AGAINST!

2 notes 

united-nations:

Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon wants to hear your views on justice and why it matters. A report capturing views shared will be presented to the UN General Assembly – so have your say on the rule of law at http://blogs.un.org/ruleoflaw

Another great outreach/survey by the UN. Click and contribute!

united-nations:

Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon wants to hear your views on justice and why it matters. A report capturing views shared will be presented to the UN General Assembly – so have your say on the rule of law at http://blogs.un.org/ruleoflaw

Another great outreach/survey by the UN. Click and contribute!

43 notes 

internationalwomensinitiative:

image

The next time you’re in a room with 6 people, think about this:

  • 1 in 4 women experience violence from their partners in their lifetimes.
  • 1 in 3 teens experience sexual or physical abuse or threats from a boyfriend or girlfriend in one year.
  • 1 in 6 women are survivors of sexual assault.
  • 1 in 5 men have experienced some form of sexual victimization in their lives.
  • 1 in 4 women and 1 in 6 men were sexually abused before the age of 18.

image

There was an excellent post I scrolled across this morning - can’t remember/find it now - but it was about the mentality of abusers and predators; they know how many [victims] take their abuse to the grave, and they count on it…

It’s never easy to speak up, but we’ve got to start somewhere and somehow.

4 notes 

SWEET BABY UNICORNS! Was this done JUST for me?!

Russell Brand is to guest-edit a special issue of the New Statesman out on Thursday 24 October. The comedian, whose recent polemic on celebrity and corporate culture at the GQ Awards went viral worldwide, will be joined by an international cast of friends and supporters as well as regular NS contributors and essayists for this issue. From climate change and gay rights to transcendental meditation and dealing with drug abuse, Brand’s guest edit will explore the theme of REVOLUTION.

from the New Statesman.H/T: C Mills
Photo: New Statesman, The cover of Russell Brand’s issue, by Shepard Fairey

SWEET BABY UNICORNS! Was this done JUST for me?!

Russell Brand is to guest-edit a special issue of the New Statesman out on Thursday 24 October. The comedian, whose recent polemic on celebrity and corporate culture at the GQ Awards went viral worldwide, will be joined by an international cast of friends and supporters as well as regular NS contributors and essayists for this issue. From climate change and gay rights to transcendental meditation and dealing with drug abuse, Brand’s guest edit will explore the theme of REVOLUTION.

from the New Statesman.H/T: C Mills

Photo: New Statesman, The cover of Russell Brand’s issue, by Shepard Fairey

1 note 

utnereader:

Take Back the Economy
In the wake of economic crisis on a global scale, more and more people are reconsidering their role in the economy and wondering what they can do to make it work better for humanity and the planet. In Take Back the Economy, J. K. Gibson-Graham, Jenny Cameron, and Stephen Healy contribute complex understandings of economics in practical terms: what can we do right now, in our own communities, to make a difference? Read more.

Beginning the post-doc reading list.

utnereader:

Take Back the Economy

In the wake of economic crisis on a global scale, more and more people are reconsidering their role in the economy and wondering what they can do to make it work better for humanity and the planet. In Take Back the Economy, J. K. Gibson-Graham, Jenny Cameron, and Stephen Healy contribute complex understandings of economics in practical terms: what can we do right now, in our own communities, to make a difference? Read more.

Beginning the post-doc reading list.

66 notes 

Let it be noted that on this day, Saturday 13 July 2013, it was still deemed legal in the US to chase and then shoot dead an unarmed young black man on his way home from the store because you didn’t like the look of him.

There is no doubt about who the aggressor was here. It appears that the only reason the two interacted at all, physically or otherwise, is that Zimmerman believed it was his civic duty to apprehend an innocent teenager who caused suspicion by his existence alone.

Appeals for calm in the wake of such a verdict raise the question of what calm there can possibly be in a place where such a verdict is possible. Parents of black boys are not likely to feel calm. Partners of black men are not likely to feel calm. Children with black fathers are not likely to feel calm. Those who now fear violent social disorder must ask themselves whose interests are served by a violent social order in which young black men can be thus slain and discarded.

Since it was Zimmerman who stalked Martin, the question remains: what ground is a young black man entitled to and on what grounds may he defend himself? What version of events is there for that night in which Martin gets away with his life? Or is it open season on black boys after dark?

Gary Younge (Chicago) for the Guardian.

Almost ALL of us, regardless of race, have a story where a young black man is killed or almost killed for, more or less, being young and black at night. My youngest brother-in-law was woken up by police at gunpoint for being asleep on a basement sofa in his late grandmother’s house in rural Maine. Thankfully, he reacted calmly and is still alive.

But the questions Younge poses remain. My question is how much more of this can the American people stomach before they EN MASSE A) leave their ‘home country’ and seek political asylum elsewhere or B) begin to hold their government, their law enforcement, their citizenry accountable for injustice.

How much more injustice do you need to see before it’s enough? Because the US citizenry has been down this road before, and history has a way of repeating itself, futility.

4 notes