Posts tagged photography

theatlantic:

In Focus: Kelud and Sinabug, Indonesia’s Two Erupting Volcanoes

Earlier today, Indonesia’s Mount Kelud erupted violently, killing two, sending massive ash plumes miles into the air, and causing more than 100,000 to evacuate parts of Java. The explosive eruption could be heard by residents more than 100 miles distant. Meanwhile, Mount Sinabung - another of Indonesia’s 150 volcanoes, continues its recent months of sporadic activity. Earlier this month, one of the scorching pyroclastic flows that poured down Sinabung’s flanks overwhelmed a group of villagers, killing 16. Collected here are images of Kelud’s activity today, and some of Sinabung’s recent outbursts.

Read more.

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fotojournalismus:

These images were selected from Canadian photojournalist Lana Slezic’s book, “Forsaken,” which were shot over her two years in Afghanistan. In a documentary for tvo (seen here), Lana says she always gravitates towards photographing women, describing an unspoken language - a universal body language - which she feels exists between the women she photographs and herself regardless of locale or barriers in spoken language.

Lana became quite close with Malalai Kakar, the first and only female police officer in Kandahar, who can be seen in the last photo. A mother of six, Malalai became a police officer prior to the Taliban’s rise, and, once they were ousted, began working as the head of the city’s department for crimes against women. In September 2008, Malalai was assissanted in front of her children at their home by the Taliban. 

Says Lana, “She was killed so unjustly and why? Because she was a woman with power, because she was helping other women.” That photo now hangs above her home computer. “My work represent a very emotional journey that has given me an insight into the lives of Afghan women, which is largely horrific. I hope that [this] collection of photographs will  communicate, influence and inspire others to learn more about the plight of Afghan women,” she says.

Many of these women are better described as girls, like eleven year old Gulsuma, seen in the third photo, who was found by Lana in an orphanage. Gulsuma was married off for 60 dollars when she was four, and was physically tortured for seven years before eventually running away. Sixteen year old Lida, seen hiding behind a door with her nails done in the eighth photo, was recently married off, and now no longer attends school (such as the one seen in the fourth photo, made from an abandoned, war torn building) or is permitted to see her own family.

The Human Rights Commission in Kandahar claims that 86% of women in Afghanistan are clinically depressed. Many who don’t run away instead attempt suicide by self immolation, like nineteen year old Zaha seen in the fifth photo. As Lana says, “Most Afghan women and girls understand all too well the concept of fear and subservience.”

She adds, “As human beings it is our responsibility to not only see and hear, but to listen and act.” For more on Afghan women, see these posts.

(via awkwardsituationist)

1,761 notes 

cenobiteme:

Nigeria’s Hyena Men by photographer Pieter Hugo 

(Source: levinedc)

24,137 notes 

Women smash: metaphor for life.
Epic photo from the Guardian’s the Press Photographer’s Year 2013.
Caption: A woman kills a water monitor lizard while clearing weeds with machetes on the Barotse flood plain, Zambia, on 18 November 2012 
Photo: Felix Clay/Duckrabbit

Women smash: metaphor for life.

Epic photo from the Guardian’s the Press Photographer’s Year 2013.

Caption: A woman kills a water monitor lizard while clearing weeds with machetes on the Barotse flood plain, Zambia, on 18 November 2012 

Photo:
Felix Clay/Duckrabbit

1 note 

futurejournalismproject:

Castro, Batman, and Superheroes Throughout History
From Slate:

Harahap’s Photoshopped “Superhistory” presents the past as if it were a comic book, seamlessly integrating pop culture icons into the photographs that build our collective memory.


must.click.through.
so.amazing.

futurejournalismproject:

Castro, Batman, and Superheroes Throughout History

From Slate:

Harahap’s Photoshopped “Superhistory” presents the past as if it were a comic book, seamlessly integrating pop culture icons into the photographs that build our collective memory.

must.click.through.

so.amazing.

314 notes 

this.

africlecticmagazine:

“They Don’t Make Them Like They Used To” ~ Mary Sibande

Mary Sibande is a South African artist based in Johannesburg. Her recent series ‘Long live the dead queen’ was featured within the city on the side of buildings and other structures as large, photographic murals. The series, like Sibande’s practice as an artist, ‘attempts to critique stereotypical depictions of women, particularly black women in our society.’

2,801 notes 

DO click through - these photos (and the individuals who designed their costumes) are AMAZING. Simply.
My sister is coming in on Friday, and my life partner/colleague from my MA is coming in on the 13th. My sister and I have opted for a weekend at Lake Windermere (train travel time), so we won’t be travelling to Whitby. However, the life partner and I … well, we have hired a car for a week … and … well, we’re all up for an adventure.
Whitby. One of those simply amazing British towns.
guardian:

Photograph: Christopher Furlong/Getty Images
A steampunk takes a breather at Whitby’s gothic weekend, which has become one of the world’s most popular events for goths since its beginnings in 1994:

Whitby was partly chosen because Bram Stoker wrote his famous Dracula story in the fishing town with the Gothic Whitby Abbey as his inspiration.

DO click through - these photos (and the individuals who designed their costumes) are AMAZING. Simply.

My sister is coming in on Friday, and my life partner/colleague from my MA is coming in on the 13th. My sister and I have opted for a weekend at Lake Windermere (train travel time), so we won’t be travelling to Whitby. However, the life partner and I … well, we have hired a car for a week … and … well, we’re all up for an adventure.

Whitby. One of those simply amazing British towns.

guardian:

Photograph: Christopher Furlong/Getty Images

A steampunk takes a breather at Whitby’s gothic weekend, which has become one of the world’s most popular events for goths since its beginnings in 1994:

Whitby was partly chosen because Bram Stoker wrote his famous Dracula story in the fishing town with the Gothic Whitby Abbey as his inspiration.

51 notes 

If there is one human thing you do with your time today, its to view these photos, read the photographer’s commentary, and remember the thousands of lives lost in this senseless war.

If there is one human thing you do with your time today, its to view these photos, read the photographer’s commentary, and remember the thousands of lives lost in this senseless war.

4 notes 

I usually wouldn’t reblog something of the sort, but I’m feeling extra broody.
This is ABSOLUTELY what the son of my husband and I could look like.
Hair, eyes, lips, ears - me
Beard, eyebrows, piercing - husband
Biggie ups random stranger for looking like my future son <3

I usually wouldn’t reblog something of the sort, but I’m feeling extra broody.

This is ABSOLUTELY what the son of my husband and I could look like.

Hair, eyes, lips, ears - me

Beard, eyebrows, piercing - husband

Biggie ups random stranger for looking like my future son <3

7,349 notes 

unicef:

PHOTO OF THE WEEK
On 6 March 2012, the world met the Millennium Development Goal to half the number of people without access to safe water, in advance of the 2015 deadline. But, disparities loom large, including in Sub-Saharan Africa, home to over 40 per cent of people who still lack access to this vital resource. Marie Bola carries a water bucket, in her village of Mabala. The country’s drinking water coverage remains among the lowest worldwide.
DR Congo, 2010 ©UNICEF/Asselin
 

unicef:

PHOTO OF THE WEEK

On 6 March 2012, the world met the Millennium Development Goal to half the number of people without access to safe water, in advance of the 2015 deadline. But, disparities loom large, including in Sub-Saharan Africa, home to over 40 per cent of people who still lack access to this vital resource. Marie Bola carries a water bucket, in her village of Mabala. The country’s drinking water coverage remains among the lowest worldwide.

DR Congo, 2010 ©UNICEF/Asselin


 

80 notes 

It was a lovely day out in Manchester today.

It was a lovely day out in Manchester today.

1 note 

in case you needed some awwww in your day
odara:

I love everything about this photo. Everything. 

in case you needed some awwww in your day

odara:

I love everything about this photo. Everything. 

9,318 notes