Posts tagged journalism

reuters:

It’s time to show the crimes committed against the Amazon forest, writes Reuters photographer Nacho Doce.

reuterspictures:

Deforestation of the Amazon: From Paradise to inferno

Photography by Nacho Doce and Ricardo Moraes

Time is not on my side at the moment, and so instead of simply neglecting my tumblr I’m reblogging things that currently strike me sans commentary.

Brain has, thusly, exploded.

2,782 notes 

If Mr. Assange is extradited to the United States, the consequences will reverberate for years around the world. Mr. Assange is not an American citizen, and none of his actions have taken place on American soil. If the United States can prosecute a journalist in these circumstances, the governments of Russia or China could, by the same logic, demand that foreign reporters anywhere on earth be extradited for violating their laws. The setting of such a precedent should deeply concern everyone, admirers of WikiLeaks or not.

Michael Moore and Oliver Stone  (via anoncentral)

Verified and presented without commentary

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Among 35 major national print publications, including The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal, men had 81 percent of the quotes in stories about abortion, the research group said Thursday, while women had 12 percent, and organizations had 7 percent.

In stories about birth control, men scored 75 percent of the quotes, with women getting 19 percent and organizations getting 6 percent. Stories about Planned Parenthood had a similar ratio, with men getting 67 percent, women getting 26 percent, and organizations getting 7 percent.

Women fared a bit better in stories about women’s rights, getting 31 percent of the quotes compared with 52 percent for men and 17 percent for organizations.

Men Rule Media Coverage of Women’s News - The Daily Beast (via librariesandlemonade)

without thepoliticalnotebook tumblr would perish.

1,511 notes 

Wall Street Journal criticizes leaders Piñera and Camila Vallejo

MUST READ: WSJ (original source)

Here’s my FAVOURITE LINE:

A large number of Chilean households want the national government to solve their problem.

No mention, at all, of the hydroelectric damming of Patagonia.

chileanstudentmovement:

Article says Chile’s education movement should act as a warning to American citizens.

Chilean politicians were still licking their wounds after a scathing critique by The Economist when just two weeks later they received another battering from a key player in the international press on Sunday.

Published in The Wall Street Journal, the article, “Chile’s Cautionary Lesson for the Americas,” criticizes the Chilean student movement and describes the left wing sentiments in Chile as “an invitation to tyranny.”

The principal target of the critique is the increasingly iconic communist student leader Camila Vallejo, who is described as a “red-diaper baby” brought up by supporters of former Chilean President Salvador Allende.

Read More

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Tumblr-dilemma:
Option 1: STOP FOLLOWING the Economist and suffer through not tearing them apart brick by brick (possibly) before other followers BUT feel less like ‘shaking the baby’
Option 2: CONTINUE TO FOLLOW and watch the rapid decent of a magazine (and staff) I used to respect (and suffer the subsequent infuriation - yes, I just invented the word)
Oh, Economist-with-a-backbone-and-shred-of-dignity/neutrality, where have you gone? WHY HAVE YOU FORSAKEN ME?!
theeconomist:

This week’s cover: the Socialist who is likely to be the next French president would be bad for his country and Europe.

Tumblr-dilemma:

Option 1: STOP FOLLOWING the Economist and suffer through not tearing them apart brick by brick (possibly) before other followers BUT feel less like ‘shaking the baby’

Option 2: CONTINUE TO FOLLOW and watch the rapid decent of a magazine (and staff) I used to respect (and suffer the subsequent infuriation - yes, I just invented the word)

Oh, Economist-with-a-backbone-and-shred-of-dignity/neutrality, where have you gone? WHY HAVE YOU FORSAKEN ME?!

theeconomist:

This week’s cover: the Socialist who is likely to be the next French president would be bad for his country and Europe.

94 notes 

Quick lesson on constructing sentences

Okay people,

Here’s the bare fact: when you do not use accurate or appropriate punctuation whatever you’re saying loses creditability - whether you’re the United Nations or someone in the midwest United States. Here are two quick lessons on sentence construction designed to keep pace with the written evolution of English-speaking humankind.

  • Commas are used to join two complete sentences with a conjunctive (and, but, for, so, because, although, etc.) in the structure of one sentence. Ex: I am not well today, and I will not go into work. Ex: Feminismis the idea that women are equal to men in capability, but it also reflects the idea that gender is not a discriminatory characteristic.
  • Semicolons are used to connect two complete sentences in the structure of one sentence that are intended to be read in tandem. Ex: I am not well today; I will not go into work. Ex: Feminism is the idea that women are equal to men in capability; it also reflects the idea that gender is not a discriminatory characteristic.

DO NOT put a comma after ‘and’ to join two sentences if both are not complete sentences (subject and verb). DO NOT use a semicolon to join an incomplete sentence to a complete sentence. 

…because you’re making me crazyface, tumblr.

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FOLLOW UP OF THE DAY:

futurejournalismproject:

The Mexican senate passed a bill yesterday that makes killing reporters — and any infringement on freedom of information — a federal offense. As we noted earlier, 40 journalists have been killed in Mexico since 2006 with very little follow through in police investigations.

The hope is that elevating such crimes to the federal level will lead to better investigations and prosecutions. The belief being that there’s less corruption at that level.

Via Reporters Without Borders:

The federal senate’s 95 members yesterday unanimously passed an amendment to article 73 of the constitution allowing the federal courts and investigators to deal with crimes that threaten the work of journalists and freedom of information. The amendment was already approved by the lower house last November.

The amendment says: “The federal authorities will also be able to try crimes under state jurisdiction when they are linked to federal crimes or when they are crimes against journalists, persons or installations that affect, limit or impinge on the right to information or the freedoms of expression and publication.” 

Mexico is ranked 149 out of 179 countries on Reporters Without Borders annual press freedom index.

33 notes 

contact the (Georgia) Rome News-Tribune
romenewstribune@rn-t.com

OR

Mike Colombo Editor MColombo@rn-t.com
domesticterrorism:


Yeah, let that sink in. You’ve got the African-American President is a 70′s pimp angle, the Sandra Fluke is a whore angle, the “evil light-skinned brother” angle, the white girl subservient to the black man angle, a complete misrepresentation of Ms. Fluke’s statements to boot and it’s all rolled up into one big insulting awful package of pure hatred for black people, women, and human beings with working souls. [angryblacklady.com]

Just, wow.

contact the (Georgia) Rome News-Tribune

romenewstribune@rn-t.com
OR
Mike Colombo Editor MColombo@rn-t.com

domesticterrorism:

Yeah, let that sink in. You’ve got the African-American President is a 70′s pimp angle, the Sandra Fluke is a whore angle, the “evil light-skinned brother” angle, the white girl subservient to the black man angle, a complete misrepresentation of Ms. Fluke’s statements to boot and it’s all rolled up into one big insulting awful package of pure hatred for black people, women, and human beings with working souls. [angryblacklady.com]

Just, wow.

(Source: azspot)

13 notes 

for all my (Manchester) phds (especially the ones still checking the non-blog since I deleted facebook).
but pretty much work a read to ANYONE. … especially 1st year undergrads?
futurejournalismproject:

Writing Tips by Henry Miller, Elmore Leonard, Margaret Atwood, Neil Gaiman & George Orwell
Henry Miller (from Henry Miller on Writing)

1. Work on one thing at a time until finished.2. Start no more new books, add no more new material to “Black Spring.”3. Don’t be nervous. Work calmly, joyously, recklessly on whatever is in hand.4. Work according to the program and not according to mood. Stop at the appointed time!5. When you can’t create you can work.6. Cement a little every day, rather than add new fertilizers.7. Keep human! See people; go places, drink if you feel like it.8. Don’t be a draught-horse! Work with pleasure only.9. Discard the Program when you feel like it–but go back to it the next day. Concentrate. Narrow down. Exclude.10. Forget the books you want to write. Think only of the book you are writing.11. Write first and always. Painting, music, friends, cinema, all these come afterwards.

George Orwell (From Why I Write)

1. Never use a metaphor, simile, or other figure of speech which you are used to seeing in print.2. Never use a long word where a short one will do.3. If it is possible to cut a word out, always cut it out.4. Never use the passive where you can use the active.5. Never use a foreign phrase, a scientific word, or a jargon word if you can think of an everyday English equivalent.6. Break any of these rules sooner than say anything outright barbarous.

Margaret Atwood (originally appeared in The Guardian)

1. Take a pencil to write with on aeroplanes. Pens leak. But if the pencil breaks, you can’t sharpen it on the plane, because you can’t take knives with you. Therefore: take two pencils.2. If both pencils break, you can do a rough sharpening job with a nail file of the metal or glass type.3. Take something to write on. Paper is good. In a pinch, pieces of wood or your arm will do.4. If you’re using a computer, always safeguard new text with a ­memory stick.5. Do back exercises. Pain is distracting.6. Hold the reader’s attention. (This is likely to work better if you can hold your own.) But you don’t know who the reader is, so it’s like shooting fish with a slingshot in the dark. What ­fascinates A will bore the pants off B.7. You most likely need a thesaurus, a rudimentary grammar book, and a grip on reality. This latter means: there’s no free lunch. Writing is work. It’s also gambling. You don’t get a pension plan. Other people can help you a bit, but ­essentially you’re on your own. ­Nobody is making you do this: you chose it, so don’t whine.8. You can never read your own book with the innocent anticipation that comes with that first delicious page of a new book, because you wrote the thing. You’ve been backstage. You’ve seen how the rabbits were smuggled into the hat. Therefore ask a reading friend or two to look at it before you give it to anyone in the publishing business. This friend should not be someone with whom you have a ­romantic relationship, unless you want to break up.9. Don’t sit down in the middle of the woods. If you’re lost in the plot or blocked, retrace your steps to where you went wrong. Then take the other road. And/or change the person. Change the tense. Change the opening page.10. Prayer might work. Or reading ­something else. Or a constant visual­isation of the holy grail that is the finished, published version of your resplendent book.

Neil Gaiman (read his free short stories here)

1. Write.2. Put one word after another. Find the right word, put it down.3. Finish what you’re writing. Whatever you have to do to finish it, finish it.4. Put it aside. Read it pretending you’ve never read it before. Show it to friends whose opinion you respect and who like the kind of thing that this is.5. Remember: when people tell you something’s wrong or doesn’t work for them, they are almost always right. When they tell you exactly what they think is wrong and how to fix it, they are almost always wrong.6. Fix it. Remember that, sooner or later, before it ever reaches perfection, you will have to let it go and move on and start to write the next thing. Perfection is like chasing the horizon. Keep moving.7. Laugh at your own jokes.8. The main rule of writing is that if you do it with enough assurance and confidence, you’re allowed to do whatever you like. (That may be a rule for life as well as for writing. But it’s definitely true for writing.) So write your story as it needs to be written. Write it ­honestly, and tell it as best you can. I’m not sure that there are any other rules. Not ones that matter.

Check out the rest of the authors’ advice at OpenCulture

for all my (Manchester) phds (especially the ones still checking the non-blog since I deleted facebook).

but pretty much work a read to ANYONE. … especially 1st year undergrads?

futurejournalismproject:

Writing Tips by Henry Miller, Elmore Leonard, Margaret Atwood, Neil Gaiman & George Orwell

Henry Miller (from Henry Miller on Writing)

1. Work on one thing at a time until finished.
2. Start no more new books, add no more new material to “Black Spring.”
3. Don’t be nervous. Work calmly, joyously, recklessly on whatever is in hand.
4. Work according to the program and not according to mood. Stop at the appointed time!
5. When you can’t create you can work.
6. Cement a little every day, rather than add new fertilizers.
7. Keep human! See people; go places, drink if you feel like it.
8. Don’t be a draught-horse! Work with pleasure only.
9. Discard the Program when you feel like it–but go back to it the next day. Concentrate. Narrow down. Exclude.
10. Forget the books you want to write. Think only of the book you are writing.
11. Write first and always. Painting, music, friends, cinema, all these come afterwards.

George Orwell (From Why I Write)

1. Never use a metaphor, simile, or other figure of speech which you are used to seeing in print.
2. Never use a long word where a short one will do.
3. If it is possible to cut a word out, always cut it out.
4. Never use the passive where you can use the active.
5. Never use a foreign phrase, a scientific word, or a jargon word if you can think of an everyday English equivalent.
6. Break any of these rules sooner than say anything outright barbarous.

Margaret Atwood (originally appeared in The Guardian)

1. Take a pencil to write with on aeroplanes. Pens leak. But if the pencil breaks, you can’t sharpen it on the plane, because you can’t take knives with you. Therefore: take two pencils.
2. If both pencils break, you can do a rough sharpening job with a nail file of the metal or glass type.
3. Take something to write on. Paper is good. In a pinch, pieces of wood or your arm will do.
4. If you’re using a computer, always safeguard new text with a ­memory stick.
5. Do back exercises. Pain is distracting.
6. Hold the reader’s attention. (This is likely to work better if you can hold your own.) But you don’t know who the reader is, so it’s like shooting fish with a slingshot in the dark. What ­fascinates A will bore the pants off B.
7. You most likely need a thesaurus, a rudimentary grammar book, and a grip on reality. This latter means: there’s no free lunch. Writing is work. It’s also gambling. You don’t get a pension plan. Other people can help you a bit, but ­essentially you’re on your own. ­Nobody is making you do this: you chose it, so don’t whine.
8. You can never read your own book with the innocent anticipation that comes with that first delicious page of a new book, because you wrote the thing. You’ve been backstage. You’ve seen how the rabbits were smuggled into the hat. Therefore ask a reading friend or two to look at it before you give it to anyone in the publishing business. This friend should not be someone with whom you have a ­romantic relationship, unless you want to break up.
9. Don’t sit down in the middle of the woods. If you’re lost in the plot or blocked, retrace your steps to where you went wrong. Then take the other road. And/or change the person. Change the tense. Change the opening page.
10. Prayer might work. Or reading ­something else. Or a constant visual­isation of the holy grail that is the finished, published version of your resplendent book.

Neil Gaiman (read his free short stories here)

1. Write.
2. Put one word after another. Find the right word, put it down.
3. Finish what you’re writing. Whatever you have to do to finish it, finish it.
4. Put it aside. Read it pretending you’ve never read it before. Show it to friends whose opinion you respect and who like the kind of thing that this is.
5. Remember: when people tell you something’s wrong or doesn’t work for them, they are almost always right. When they tell you exactly what they think is wrong and how to fix it, they are almost always wrong.
6. Fix it. Remember that, sooner or later, before it ever reaches perfection, you will have to let it go and move on and start to write the next thing. Perfection is like chasing the horizon. Keep moving.
7. Laugh at your own jokes.
8. The main rule of writing is that if you do it with enough assurance and confidence, you’re allowed to do whatever you like. (That may be a rule for life as well as for writing. But it’s definitely true for writing.) So write your story as it needs to be written. Write it ­honestly, and tell it as best you can. I’m not sure that there are any other rules. Not ones that matter.

Check out the rest of the authors’ advice at OpenCulture

363 notes 

aljazeera:

Photographs from the centre of a tragedy | 

For photographer Massoud Hossaini, the personal and professional came to a head while shooting blast at Shia shrine.


Click photo for story

aljazeera:

Photographs from the centre of a tragedy |

For photographer Massoud Hossaini, the personal and professional came to a head while shooting blast at Shia shrine.

Click photo for story

348 notes 

Last month the Inter-Parliamentary Union, which represents MPs from 157 countries, unanimously adopted a resolution condemning the move by the Justice Department. The IPU said the move threatened free speech and suggested it could violate Article 19 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which upholds the right of everyone to freedom of opinion and expression.

Birgitta Jonsdottir: How the US Justice Department legally hacked my Twitter account

Icelandic MP and former WikiLeaks volunteer Birgitta Jonsdottir has slammed the decision by US courts to open her Twitter account to the US authorities and is taking her case to the Council of Europe.

Jonsdottir learned in January that her Twitter account was under scrutiny from the Justice Department because of her involvement last year with WikiLeaks’ release of a video showing a US military helicopter shooting two Reuters reporters in Iraq. She believes the US authorities want to use her information to try and build a case against WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange.

7 notes 

theatlantic:

“Qaddafi soldiers at 300 meters,” a rebel in another car told us. Bullshit, I thought. The four of us looked at each other and shook our heads. We’d seen no such thing, and had frequently gotten faulty intelligence from rebels. We milled about for a while, asking if we could ride with the rebels when they launched a counteroffensive. We moved to the side of the road in case of shelling, which tended to hit the center of the road. That’s when we heard automatic gunfire; the warning was right. I heard Anton shout, “We have to get in a truck!” But the only rebel vehicles in sight were fleeing the scene and we weren’t close enough to get in, so we ran deeper into the desert to take cover in a small copse of trees.

Clare Morgana Gillis was captured by Qaddafi soldiers in April while reporting for The Atlantic. This is her story. 

43 notes 

There’s a distinction between what happened to you as a journalist and what happened to you as a woman. Before there was the risk — we always had a fear of something happening to us when we covered conflict, but now I have the additional fear of what can happen to me because I’m a woman, the specific vulnerability of what can happen to my body because I’m a woman.
Jineth Bedoya Lima, a Colombian journalist and rape survivor, who was kidnapped and tortured and raped because of her work on an investigation into arms trafficking among state officials and a right-wing paramilitary group. For the last eleven years, her case has remained largely untouched in Colombia. She is now pursuing justice for herself and recognition for the gendered violence that faces female journalists on an international level. (via thepoliticalnotebook)

70 notes 

thedailywhat:

Photography Is Not A Crime of the Day: The American Civil Liberties Union of Southern California has filed a lawsuit against the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department alleging the harassment, unlawful detainment, and improper searching of multiple photographers whose only “crime” was snapping photos in a public place.

“Photography is not a crime. It’s protected 1st Amendment expression,” senior staff attorney for ACLU SoCal Peter Bibring told the Los Angeles Times. “It violates the Constitution’s core protections for sheriff’s deputies to detain and search people who are doing nothing wrong. To single them out for such treatment while they’re pursuing a constitutionally protected activity is doubly wrong.”

In their suit, the ACLU cite at least six incidents involving three photographers who were detained while photographing in public.

In one case, as the video above shows, professional photographer and photographer rights advocate Shawn “discarted” Nee was stopped and searched by Deputy Richard Gylfie. The ACLU says Nee complained, but the Sherrif’s department did nothing.

Bibring says police take the post-9/11 policy of “suspicious activity reporting” too far, and demands a court order preventing the Sheriff’s Department from detaining people simply for snapping photos.

“Should we really ignore suspicious activity?” responded LA County sheriff’s Capt. Mike Parker when asked to comment. “We have an obligation to the public to answer questions and we are going to ask people why are you taking that picture. It is our duty to protect the public.”

The department would not comment on specific incidents. 

[latimes / bloggingla / thanks photo_la!]

300 notes