Posts tagged USA

rootrise:

Le Thi Thu, 42, and her daughter, Nguyen Thi Ly, 11, live in a village south of Da Nang, Vietnam. They are second and third generation victims of dioxin exposure, the result of the U.S. military’s use of Agent Orange and other herbicides during the Vietnam War more than 40 years ago. | Drew Brown/MCT
Agent Orange/dioxin in southeast Asia
Read more here: http://www.mcclatchydc.com/2013/07/22/197318/4-decades-after-war-ended-agent.html#.Ue6lARweN7c#storylink=cpy

rootrise:

Le Thi Thu, 42, and her daughter, Nguyen Thi Ly, 11, live in a village south of Da Nang, Vietnam. They are second and third generation victims of dioxin exposure, the result of the U.S. military’s use of Agent Orange and other herbicides during the Vietnam War more than 40 years ago. | Drew Brown/MCT

Agent Orange/dioxin in southeast Asia

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Let it be noted that on this day, Saturday 13 July 2013, it was still deemed legal in the US to chase and then shoot dead an unarmed young black man on his way home from the store because you didn’t like the look of him.

There is no doubt about who the aggressor was here. It appears that the only reason the two interacted at all, physically or otherwise, is that Zimmerman believed it was his civic duty to apprehend an innocent teenager who caused suspicion by his existence alone.

Appeals for calm in the wake of such a verdict raise the question of what calm there can possibly be in a place where such a verdict is possible. Parents of black boys are not likely to feel calm. Partners of black men are not likely to feel calm. Children with black fathers are not likely to feel calm. Those who now fear violent social disorder must ask themselves whose interests are served by a violent social order in which young black men can be thus slain and discarded.

Since it was Zimmerman who stalked Martin, the question remains: what ground is a young black man entitled to and on what grounds may he defend himself? What version of events is there for that night in which Martin gets away with his life? Or is it open season on black boys after dark?

Gary Younge (Chicago) for the Guardian.

Almost ALL of us, regardless of race, have a story where a young black man is killed or almost killed for, more or less, being young and black at night. My youngest brother-in-law was woken up by police at gunpoint for being asleep on a basement sofa in his late grandmother’s house in rural Maine. Thankfully, he reacted calmly and is still alive.

But the questions Younge poses remain. My question is how much more of this can the American people stomach before they EN MASSE A) leave their ‘home country’ and seek political asylum elsewhere or B) begin to hold their government, their law enforcement, their citizenry accountable for injustice.

How much more injustice do you need to see before it’s enough? Because the US citizenry has been down this road before, and history has a way of repeating itself, futility.

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Protesters carry placards as they protest against the visit of U.S. President Barack Obama in Pretoria, June 28, 2013. REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko
Can we just talk about how awesome this is? And that by signing the petition against UJ’s decision to award Obama an honouray doctorate I was automatically updated and informed about this protest, despite being in rainy Britain?

Protesters carry placards as they protest against the visit of U.S. President Barack Obama in Pretoria, June 28, 2013. REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko

Can we just talk about how awesome this is? And that by signing the petition against UJ’s decision to award Obama an honouray doctorate I was automatically updated and informed about this protest, despite being in rainy Britain?

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Are you being an asshole?

From PoliticalProf answers:

When you referred to ‘Americans’ in your geographical explanation of Gaza, I’m pretty sure you were just talking about people residing in the United States which should probably be clarified. Educated students in Canada have a better sense of geography, and they are also technically ‘Americans’, as America consists of two continents, not just one country that has a reputation for being ignorant or bull-headed.

you’re off the hook: no Americans consider Canadians to be Americans.

—update: besides, your population density per square mile is in the single digits … ;-)

Revolutiontrainee:

A little more analysis: I think Politicalprof handled this well. Here’s my contribution: many Americans think it’s acceptable to refer to the USA as America, and that’s fine - in the USA. When you travel abroad, or live abroad as I or hnhobu do, it becomes incredibly ignorant and offensive to other Americans, be they North, Central, or South.

Two further contributions from the UK: Here, people hear an American accent and ask, ‘Are you Canadian?’ Two reasons: 1) they don’t want to offend the Canadians by presuming they are from the USA with the similar accent, and 2) they recognise being ‘American’ means more than being from the USA, and they are clever so they like to make their knowledge public :-).

The simple fact is, internationally, it is disrespectful (and factually inaccurate) to call the country of the USA, ‘America’; because Latin Americans were using ‘America’ to reference their collective countries LONG before it became popular in the USA. It’s also disrespectful to assume all Americans come (only) from the USA. Domestically, in the USA, the terms of usage have a common cultural meaning to denote one country; that’s fine, if you’re speaking exclusively to other people from the USA when using these terms.

Don’t believe me? … come have a few beers with some of the ‘Americans’ in Britain. Those South Americans can get pretty testy about it… :-)

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Part 1 of 2: Breaking down thepoliticalnotebook’s ‘This Week In War’

She just does such a great service for all of us on tumblr.

Some of the links are difficult to click through because the content shakes us, disturbs us, and we’re left unsettled. In my opinion there were at least 3 posts (1 post not part of my series) from her weekly round up that warrant a further breakdown for anyone to disturbed to click through or looking for the ‘meat and veg’ of it.

Part 1:from thepoliticalnotebook

IAVA released its annual survey of members this Monday. Veterans listed as their top concerns in this order: employment, mental health, disability benefits, health care, education, suicide and families.

Here are some of the findings from the report I think are essential to break down:

  • "17 percent said they were unemployed when they took the survey in January, a higher rate than was documented by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, which put the veterans’ unemployment rate for January at 9 percent." (Source: NY Times; all quotes below from same source) ...I’ve said this time and time again, the US Bureau of Labor Statistics might as well pull their numbers out of hat. Also, 9% are disabled and unable to work.
  • 'More than one in three respondents, 37 percent, said they knew someone who had committed suicide, down slightly from last year’s result. Asked if the person who committed suicide was serving or had separated from the military, respondents were almost evenly divided: 30 percent said the person had separated when the act occurred; 27 percent said the person was serving but not deployed; 25 percent said the person was serving and deployed. Another 11 percent said the person was in the National Guard and not deployed.'
  • 'Two-thirds said they think troops and veterans are not getting the mental health care they need.'
  • 'Asked about their relationships, nearly 80 percent said they were married or in a long-term relationship during a deployment. Nearly two-thirds said the deployment strained their relationships, and 6 in 10 said readjustment was difficult.'
  • Nearly 9 in 10 of those surveyed were men
  • 6 in 10 were Army veterans
  • More than 8 in 10 had served in Iraq.
  • Almost half, 45 percent, were 36 years or older.
  • Nine in 10 said they were registered to vote.
  • When asked, ‘The President listens enough to service members
    and Iraq and Afghanistan veterans.’ (Source: IAVA), 23% Agree or Strongly Agree; 16% No Opinion, and 61% Disagree or Strongly Disagree
  • When asked, ‘Congress listens enough to service members and
    Iraq and Afghanistan veterans.’ (ibid), 13% Agree or Strongly Agree; 13% No Opinion, and 75% Disagree or Strongly Disagree
  • When asked, ‘Corporate America supports service members and
    Iraq and Afghanistan veterans.’ (ibid), 32% Agree or Strongly Agree; 22% No Opinion, and 46% Disagree or Strongly Disagree (the most variant across the 5 questions asked on public opinion)

These are just some pieces I pulled from the article and corresponding report (available for download at the IAVA link above) that I found interesting/alarming/disturbing.

Thoughts?

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After going through thepoliticalnotebook's Friday links, (especially the one on the US solider(s)’ 17 March killing of Afghan civilians from the first Western journalist to cover the story on the ground) I was left remembering the patches that went around tumblr a few weeks ago. Here were a few others I found while surfing.
…apparently these patches originate with Benjamin Franklin’s 1751 symbolism during the independence of the United States from Great Britain.
Tell me why/if/how these patches affect you?

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Scientists at Monsanto Speak Out

this came via anoncentral but their link was busted.*turns out you have to go original source to watch the worthwhile short video trailer, reblogging makes video disappear*

a little non-academic speak for the day - ‘cause brain est muerto.

part of the reason i’ve expatriated (still in progress) is because since i was 9 (1992), eating in the US, i have had unexplainable stomach pain. they ran tests; results inconclusive. so since 1992 (!), i haven’t eaten meat in the US - because not eating meat seemed to result in a whole lot less stomach pain. after 2007, almost every meal caused me pain. in 2009 things got so bad, I survived on vodka and water mostly for about 4 months (i’ve met other people who had similar pain and said vodka helped). the pain got to be too much. another gambit of tests were run *the extent of medical technology* (shout out to CICP - Colorado Indigent Care Program); results inconclusive.

when i visited Britain in October 2009, i finally ate without pain. since i’ve (temporarily) immigrated, i’ve really had no problems - except now i can’t stomach red wine, which is lame.

as an (agricultural) political economist, my research was shunned from US doctoral programs. i wanted to research to what extent do US agricultural subsidies, particularly in corn and cotton, artificially deflate global agricultural markets. not one person would so much as hear my proposal. i’m currently supervised at the University of Manchester.

i’m not saying Britain is this great free, food-Mecca. i’m saying people in the US have it ‘the shittest’ when it comes to how GMO’ed your food is. and its because monsanto controls dominates dictates, permeates US politics, supremely.

check this out:

i’m not arguing a fallacy -false deduction, Dean?- here. i’m simply saying - in a non-academic, brain dead way - … watch out for your food.

tonybaldwin:


Disclose.tv - Scientists inside MONSANTO speak the truth Video

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