37thstate:

Stunning! Model/Tv personality Zainab Balogun for CLAN Classics Lookbook. Photography: Lakin Ogunbanwo

Get to know CLAN’s creative director Teni Sagoe in this short clip 

http://bit.ly/VKY40g

See more lookbook on their facebook.

13,289 notes 

Changing over the garden today.
Our cat us derpy, eh, dapperandspiffing.

4 notes 

globalvoices:

Join Us for a #GVMeetup in Tunis on November 1

At one point I had a couple of Tunisian followers; none lived in Tunis though… reblogging just in case.

globalvoices:

Join Us for a #GVMeetup in Tunis on November 1

At one point I had a couple of Tunisian followers; none lived in Tunis though… reblogging just in case.

15 notes 

"They’re like, ‘Sir, there’s something in your bag.’

I said, ‘Yes, I think it’s this box.’

They said, ‘What’s in the box?’

I said, ‘a large gold medal,’ as one does.

So they opened it up and they said, ‘What’s it made out of?’

I said, ‘gold.’

And they’re like, ‘Uhhhh. Who gave this to you?’

‘The King of Sweden.’

‘Why did he give this to you?’

‘Because I helped discover the expansion rate of the universe was accelerating.’

Brian Schmidt, 2011 Nobel Prize winner in Physics, explaining his Nobel Prize to the TSA agents inspecting it on his flight to see his grandmother in Fargo.

Today, in conversations I will never have ….

(via politicalprof)

283 notes 

ezibota:

The African-Italian Project replied: 

"I moved to Italy when I was very young, and I did not “choose” to move from where I was born (West Africa), but I guess, as you suggested, my parents were in search for a better life.

I do not know about the experience of others, and especially about the experience of others in different places (because different people may be accustomed to a different view of the world), however what Italy did to me was to reveal with uncomfortable truth what it meant to be black.
It might sound bizarre, but moving to Italy made me aware of being “black” and I soon had to learn the responsibility that came with it. I lived in the shadow of discrimination and racism, which came on a daily basis, so I started to question myself what it meant and if and how I was different from others.

After leaving for more than ten years in this country and having been involved fully in the socio-political activity, I understand that citizenship is not the colour of one’s skin or one’s passport, but the cultural development that one has gone through. To belong to a place or a culture is something that needs no validation; it’s a personal growth that comes as natural as breathing.

Africa is the motherland yes, but, and I might probably sound romantic on this, the motherland is where the heart desire is! A friend once asked if there’s ever going to be a time when we as Africans are going to go back home. This question begs explanation, because before “going back home”, we need to interrogate ourselves about the notion of “home”. What does “home” mean to us right now?

Most people find it difficult to associate African with European, but the reality is eloquent: they can coexist in one being, because one culture does not exclude the other but they are both enriched by one another.”

Join the discussion on Ezibota.com

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15 notes 

Hundreds of students and teachers smashed windows and set fires inside a state capital building in southern Mexico, as fury erupted over the disappearance of 43 young people believed abducted by local police linked to a drug cartel.

dynamicafrica:

Spotlight: Photographer Damion Reid and the “Beauty of the Black Woman” Project.

How do you describe what a black woman is? How do you even begin to define her?

You don’t. You leave that up to her.

As black women, as black people, we are well aware of our complexities - whether inherited or otherwise. What’s more, despite our differences being used to divide and separate us, whether through experience or heritage, history has played out in such a way that we are and will always be connected to each other in ways words cannot even begin to describe. As romantic as this may sound, and though there is so much beauty in who we are, there’s a lot of pain that we are still forced to triumph through. Despite all this, as we combat that which has manifested in our lives through both structural and internal racism, it’s so important that we look for ways to find and recreate ourselves on our terms.

Living in a world where black women have to constantly defend their existence and personally find ways to continuously reaffirm their beauty and self-worth, it’s hard not to love what Damion Reid does.

As a Communications Major, Reid was, to say the least, troubled by the negative images and stories he’d often come across of Black women and Black people in the Diaspora. In the Spring of 2002, armed with his camera and desire to show the multi-faceted reality of Black women, he began approaching women he’d see in public in an attempt to capture the “Beauty of the Black Woman.”

Ridding himself of mainstream notions of what beauty is or is supposed to look like, Reid opted to go for something deeper when approaching women, "I share a spiritual bond with Black Women. They are the only people that can understand what me a Black Male goes through. That is beauty to me. I go with my feelings. If it feels right to approach someone, I will do it."

So far, the responses Reid has received have been incredibly positive and wonderfully surprising, “Sometimes the Women are shocked that I want to photograph them. They were not used to be called beautiful, much less photographed.”

For Reid, this is a “never-ending project.” He does plan on taking things further and is currently working on a project that concerns Black men in the Diaspora. 

All photos courtesy of Damion Reid.

Twitter | FacebookPinterest | InstagramSoundcloud | Mixcloud

12,902 notes 

africashowboy:

"Do you know what this place used to be? It used to be a slave route. Where the stage is, that used to be a dungeon and they built this over it to cover it. Look over there, it looks like a gutter but that was the tunnel they were using to move the slaves and goods to the ship. Look carefully at where we are, do you realise we are in between the Osu castle and the old harbour? A lot of people come to this hotel but they don’t know the history."
I stood there stunned, as I listen to AK. The transatlantic slave trade, during which over 100 million Africans lost their lives en route to Europe, America and the Islands, is a conversation we don’t have enough in Africa.
As I made this portrait of Kozo, I wondered if he knew that right where he lies comfortably, thousands of his brothers and sisters had moaned to death, not that long ago in our human history?
Photo by Nana Kofi Acquah @africashowboy

100 million.

africashowboy:

"Do you know what this place used to be? It used to be a slave route. Where the stage is, that used to be a dungeon and they built this over it to cover it. Look over there, it looks like a gutter but that was the tunnel they were using to move the slaves and goods to the ship. Look carefully at where we are, do you realise we are in between the Osu castle and the old harbour? A lot of people come to this hotel but they don’t know the history."

I stood there stunned, as I listen to AK. The transatlantic slave trade, during which over 100 million Africans lost their lives en route to Europe, America and the Islands, is a conversation we don’t have enough in Africa.

As I made this portrait of Kozo, I wondered if he knew that right where he lies comfortably, thousands of his brothers and sisters had moaned to death, not that long ago in our human history?

Photo by Nana Kofi Acquah @africashowboy

100 million.

247 notes 

If Ebola does not kill us, maybe hardship and hunger will get us down if no one helps us before Christmas.

Three of my friends who were to sit the BECCE (GCSE equivalent) exams have been impregnated already and I am also under pressure to go after men in order to survive and to buy a dress for Christmas. This is what girls have to do in Sierra Leone when there is no money. It is not right, but it is normal. If this Ebola does not end soon, many more girls will get pregnant before schools reopen and that will be too bad for the future of children in this country.